Posts tagged ‘Trolley’

More Trolley Routes

Photo by Mike Nice

The trolley routes in Greenville will be rearranged, and 2 new trolleys and 2 new routes added. They will now serve more than just the West End as shown in this sidewalk collage.

See the trolley schedule and routes at Greenlink Trolley and get the free trolley tracker app from TrackTheTrolley.com.

Side note: this tile collage by Suzanne Vitti also lists the sister cities for Greenville: Bergamo, Italy, Kortrijk, Belgium, Tianjin, China.

Code for Greenville

Photo by Mike Nice

Photo by Mike Nice

Yesterday’s Trolley Tracker apps (at TrackTheTrolley.com) were developed for the city of Greenville by Code for Greenville at no charge because the members wanted to improve access to the trolley themselves. Software development took place during spare time over a period of 18 months. Coordination and implementation took place on pizza-fueled “Hack Nights”, such as the one shown here at Next on Main.

I’m a member of Code for Greenville and implemented a part of the software for the project.

Trolley Tracker

Photo by Mike Nice

Photo by Mike Nice

The city of Greenville runs a free trolley which is entertaining for kids, transport in cold or rainy weather, or a convenient way to move from one part of town to another. Until now, it has been hard to know which days the trolley runs, and how long it might be to wait until it comes along.

Thanks to a partnership between the organization Code for Greenville, Greenlink, and the city of Greenville, there are new free Smartphone apps to give route information, show the location of stops, as well as the current trolley locations.

The apps can be found at the bottom of the page at TrackTheTrolley.com

Trolley History in Greenville

Photo by Mike Nice

Photo by Mike Nice

This trolley art mosaic by Suzanne Vitti was placed in the sidewalk in the west end in 2009. Some curious observations from the text:

There were no paved roads in Greenville until 1883.
By 1898 the first electric street cars railway system was running. The first “Beltline” came in 1904. The service moved from Buncombe Street to Augusta Road to Main Street.
In 1904 there were 5 cars in the county. By 1914 there were 1,038 cars in Greenville, the largest number in any county in the State.
In 1905 it was a $5.00 fine if you did not walk your horse across the Reedy River Bridge.
Originally, the trolley cars were tracked and moved by mules
In 1937 Duke Power announced that old street cars would be replaced by buses and trackless trolleys.